National Labor Relations Board

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) was established by Congress in 1935 to execute the National Labor Relations Act.  The National Labor Relations Act was enacted to guarantee the rights of employees and employers, to encourage collective bargaining and to curtail unfair labor practices.  NLRB is a quasi-judicial body in deciding cases on the basis of formal records in administrative proceedings.

The NLRB is governed by two major components: Board members and the Office of the General Counsel.  NLRB consists of five board members who are appointed by the President with Senate consent.  The members serve for a period of five years.  The term of one member expires each year.

Headquarters of the NLRB is located in Washington, D.C.  The Board has 51 field offices in different U.S. locations.

The main functions of the NLRB are:

  1. remedying and curtailing unfair labor practices; and
  2. establishing whether or not certain employees desire labor organization representatives for collective bargaining.

The General Counsel is appointed by the President with Senate consent for a period of four years.  The Office of the General Counsel is independent from the Board and functions to investigate and prosecute unfair labor practices.  The General Counsel is also responsible for the general supervision of the NLRB field offices.


Inside National Labor Relations Board